>Feb. 1-8

By | What's In Bloom | February 1, 2011 | No comments

This weeks picks highlight “winter interest” in the garden as snow provides a dramatic backdrop for many plants.
In the Show Garden- South you will find:
Chamaecyparis pisifera ‘Filifera Aureovariegata’ (Sawara false cypress); this variegated thread-leaf form of Sawara cypress has excellent green and golden yellow foliage making it an an instant eye-catcher in the winter garden
In the Show Garden- South:
Pinus mugo ‘Aurea Fastigiata’ (Mountain pine); this cultivar of mugo pine is distinguished by its relatively upright growth and golden-yellow winter foliage.
In the Knot Garden:
Fagus sylvaticaforma purpurea ‘Cuprea’ (Purple/Copper beech); these beautiful slow-growing trees with attractive ,smooth silver bark will hold their leaves through the winter.
In the Entry Garden:
Sedum spectabile (now Hylotelephium spectabile) (Stonecrop); this clump forming perennial known for its succulent-like fleshy leaves and stems, holds up well in Canadian winters with flattened flower heads held until chopped down in spring
In the Entry Garden:
Liatris spicata (Blazing star) with Echinacea ‘Sunrise’ (Big Sky series) (Purple coneflower); Liatris is a native prairie flower, here with the hybrid coneflower Sunrise; these two plants will hold their seed heads up under a blanket of snow until we gardeners cut them back in spring
In the Entry Garden:
Panicum virgatum ‘Shenandoah’ (Switch grass); valued for its red-tipped foliage in summer, turning deep burgundy by fall, this native prairie grass stands up well through winter – bring on the snow!

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Sandra Pella about the author: Sandra Pella

Sandra Pella has worked as Head Gardener of the Toronto Botanical Garden since 2008. She holds a degree in Political Science from the University of Western Ontario, and upon graduation worked in the financial sector until the pull of plants was too much to resist, whereupon she found herself at Janet Anderson Perennials (formerly JEA Perennials) as a horticultural technician. She has been the Perennial Manager at Summerhill Nursery & Floral followed by the Assistant Horticulturist at the TBG prior to its renovation. Sandra worked as a Gardener for two seasons with the City of Toronto as well as seasonal Gardener for the TBG prior to being named Head Gardener. She is self-taught in the field and thus greatly appreciated the experience a gardening internship in 2009 at Great Dixter in the UK brought to her. Sandra has a regular What’s In Bloom blog and is one of the spokespeople for the TBG.

TORONTO BOTANICAL GARDEN, 777 Lawrence Avenue East, Toronto, ON CANADA | 416-397-1341 | info@torontobotanicalgarden.ca